Dr. Bettina L. Love is an award-winning author and Associate Professor of Educational Theory & Practice at the University of Georgia. Dr. Love is one of the field’s most esteemed educational researchers in the area of Hip Hop education. Her research focuses on the ways in which urban youth negotiate Hip Hop music and culture to form social, cultural, and political identities to create new and sustainable ways of thinking about urban education and intersectional social justice. Her work is also concerned with how teachers and schools working with parents and communities can build communal, civically engaged schools rooted in intersectional social justice for the goal of equitable classrooms.

I believe in the importance of educating the educator in order to build communal, civically engaged schools rooted in intersectional social justice for the goal of equitable classrooms. I focus on education within urban communities and my research centers in the area of Hip Hop education.

Hip Hop education can help young, black students become more successful and confident by giving them a chance to express themselves. In this way, my research aims to help educators understand marginalized youth including queer, urban and African-American groups.

I hope that my students learn to incorporate innovative styles of teaching and embrace diversity within the education system. I think that the education field needs more diverse teachers and educators that come from different backgrounds. I want to be able to help my students understand their impact as educators and their influence on young minds.
I have written two books based on my research. My latest is We Want To Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom. The first text is Hip Hop’s Li’l Sistas Speak: Negotiating Hip Hop Identities and Politics in the New South.

Learn more about Bettina Love.

Bettina L. Love
Area of Study: 
Education